Video – Curfew opponents make their case during CAB meeting

We’ve now uploaded several excerpts of Monday’s Silver Spring Citizens Advisory Board meeting, where the proposed youth curfew ordinance was discussed. The clips can be played in sequence as a playlist, or viewed individually. In the prior post, we shared several interviews with curfew opponents after Monday’s Citizen Advisory Board meeting. In this post, we share statements made to the board by Thomas Nephew, Leah Muskin-Pierret, and Jim Zepp.

Thomas Nephew is a member of the Montgomery County Civil Rights Coalition.
“Even as revised, even with all the other good ideas that I fully support — working with youth… police substations– even with those revisions a measure like this punishes all kids in the future for the misdeeds of a few in the past. “

Leah Muskin-Pierret is a Montgomery Blair High School student and co-founder of “Stand Up to the Montgomery County Curfew.”
“I’m 17 and in about two and a half hours I will become either a violent criminal or a helpless victim. Or so goes the logic.”

Jim Zepp is a director of the Justice Research and Statistics Association (JRSA).
“The police have made the case that a curfew can be a tool in their toolbox. They have *not* really made the case that it’s going to be an effective tool for solving Silver Spring’s problems.”

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One Response to Video – Curfew opponents make their case during CAB meeting

  1. My comments, in full:
    “My name’s Thomas Nephew, I’m with the Montgomery County Civil Rights Coalition. We are very skeptical of this proposal. I personally am in respectful but unshakeable oppostion to a measure like this. Even as revised, even with all the other good ideas that I fully support — working with youth, others I’ve heard about – have a substation in areas that are concerned – I think that even with those revisions a measure like this punishes all kids, all youth, restricts the freedom of all youth in the future for the misdeeds of a few in the past.

    And that’s just not right. I would say that’s not the American way, except that it once was. It was what happened before the Civil War and [under] Jim Crow after the Civil War where freedom of movement was restricted on purpose to keep a group of people down, keep them from moving around, keep them from exercising their right of movement, their right to be as they pleased. That it’s youth is different, I admit, I’m a parent, but I don’t want to be put in the position of saying because my child was out after 12 with my permission that I’m on the hook. I don’t think that she has done anything wrong necessarily by doing that, and while I appreciate that police in Montgomery County are professional and usually I don’t have any problem with what they do, I can’t guarantee that in the future and I don’t think that you write laws about this kind of thing expecting the best of the police force. It’s just not how things ought to happen. There will be other police chiefs, there will be other police forces, we will get worried again, and we will do things then that we set up now, that we’ll wish we hadn’t. I think we’ve seen that in the last ten years too.

    I think this country has the 4th and 14th amendments for very good reasons. The 14th amendment was written, in part, to limit just those kinds of restrictions on movement. And I also think that the penalty that we’re talking about — even if we succeeded in applying this in a racially colorblind way — would disproportionately affect the poor. It’s a lot different for me to consider a $100 fine than it is for somebody on welfare to consider a $100 fine, somebody who’s poor to consider a $100 fine. I don’t think it’s right. I think we’re better than this, and I think if PG does it and DC does it, that doesn’t mean we have to do it.”

    Like

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